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By Linux Geeks, For Linux Geeks.

Download Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet Final ISO / CD / DVD / x86_64 / 32-Bit

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  Images can be downloaded from a location near you. You can download ISOs from: http://releases.ubuntu.com/15.04/ (Ubuntu Desktop, Server, and Snappy Core) http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/15.04/release/ (Ubuntu Cloud Server) http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/netboot/15.04/ (Ubuntu Netboot) http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/kubuntu/releases/15.04/release/ (Kubuntu) http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/lubuntu/releases/15.04/release/ (Lubuntu) http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntustudio/releases/15.04/release/ (Ubuntu Studio) http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-gnome/releases/15.04/release/ (Ubuntu GNOME) http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntukylin/releases/15.04/release/ (Ubuntu Kylin) http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-mate/releases/15.04/release/ (Ubuntu MATE) http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/xubuntu/releases/15.04/release/ (Xubuntu) Enjoy Ubuntu 15.04 Enjoy Linux Enjoy Open Source […]

Why and how to publish a plugin at WordPress.org

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The first ever WordCamp was held in Finland on May 8th and 9th in Tampere. Many from our staff participated in the event and Seravo was also one of the sponsors.

On Friday Otto Kekäläinen had a talk with the title “Contributing to WordPress.org – Why you (and your company) should publish plugins at WordPress.org”. On Saturday he held workshops titled “How to publish a plugin at WordPress.org” and Onni Hakala held a workshop about how to develop with WordPress using Git, Composer, Vagrant and other great tools.

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Below are the slides from these presentations and workshops:



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WordCamp Workshop on modern dev tools by Onni Hakala (in Finnish)

 

See also our recap on WordCamp Finland 2015 in Finnish: WP-palvelu.fi/blogi

 

wp-palvelu-logo

 

(Photos by Jaana Björklund)

 

Written by Otto Kekäläinen

May 13th, 2015 at 6:27 am

Change default runlevel in CentOS 7 / RHEL 7 | GUI | NON-GUI

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Hello All, As systemd is already implemented in CentOS 7 and RHEL 7, Method has been changed to change runlevel in Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS 7. So sharing method to change runlevel in CentOS and RHEL 7   Please perform following simple steps to change runlevel from GUI to NON-GUI and NON-GUI to GUI. […]

Fixing Gummi “Compilation program is missing” error

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I use LaTeX, mostly beamer, for my slides. I really like the Warsaw theme and it has been the default for almost all my presentations since quite some time now. Gummi is my choice of editor for this since it is dead simple and I can see the preview as the slides develop in the side pane.
However installing Gummi in Fedora never pulls all the dependencies for me. So I always get a compilation error on a fresh installation. In this tutorial I am going to write about how to setup Gummi to fix that issue.



Step 1: Install Gummi
# yum install gummi

Step 2: Install compilation tools
# yum install rubber latexmk texlive-xetex

Step 3: Install beamer for the warsaw and other themes
# yum install beamer

Step 4: For presentations, I usually need SI units.
# yum install texlive-siunitx-svn31333.2.5s

And this is about it!

Written by Aditya Patawari

May 9th, 2015 at 2:45 am

Creating superscript and subscript font in Libreoffice

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We need to use the following steps to turn a text to a superscript or subscript in libreoffice

Let us say we have the text Super Script 4, and we want to transfer the number 4 into a super script.

 photo super_script_1.png

First select the text that has to be made into super script and then right click as shown below.

 photo super_script_2.png

Select the option "character" which will pop out a menu with multiple tabs as shown below.

 photo super_script_3.png

Select the tab titled "position". In this tab under the heading "position" we will notice three options



To turn the text into superscript select the superscript option and click on OK.

To turn the text to subscript select subscript.

If we select the text will automatically turn into superscript as shown below.

By default the text gets raised/lowered by 33%, if we want to change the amount of raising/lowering of the text,then go back to the menu where we selected the superscript/subscript.

On right side to the options of position of the text we will notice options as shown below.

 photo super_script_5.png

Uncheck the option "Automatic" and then enter the percentage of raise in the text box provided next to "Raise/lower by" to change the amount of raise. The following is after changing the amount of raise to 80%


Written by Tux Think

May 7th, 2015 at 9:49 am

Posted in libreoffice,Linux

Bad Voltage Season 1 Episode 41: Second Lunch is my Favourite Lunch

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Jono Bacon, Bryan Lunduke, Stuart Langridge and myself present Bad Voltage, in which hell may be slightly chillier than previously. Featuring the uses for abundant graphical power, the nature of what “cross-platform” really means, and:

  • 00:02:15 Google announce Google Fi, a new MVNO-style mobile network joining together wifi, Sprint, and T-Mobile for US customers and allowing international roaming and a pay-what-you-need rate for data. Is this actually a good idea? What about how it only works on the Nexus 6?
  • 00:18:00 We speak to Mashable senior tech correspondent and podcaster Christina “@film_girl” Warren about the Microsoft Build conference announcement that the Visual Studio Code editor is newly available for Linux as well as other platforms, and MS’s apparent increasing friendliness to open source. Is it real? Is it good?
  • 00:37:16 Bryan reviews the NVIDIA Jetson TK-1 development kit, a Raspberry-Pi-style small board but with 192 GPU cores
  • 00:51:12 A blog comment from Glyph suggesting that “Linux is not, practically speaking, more tweakable” than alternative desktop OSes starts a discussion about whether that’s the truth and why Linux desktop automation tools aren’t (or are) as good as AppleScript and Windows COM automation

Listen to 1×41: Second Lunch is my Favourite Lunch

As mentioned here, Bad Voltage is a project I’m proud to be a part of. From the Bad Voltage site: Every two weeks Bad Voltage delivers an amusing take on technology, Open Source, politics, music, and anything else we think is interesting, as well as interviews and reviews. Do note that Bad Voltage is in no way related to LinuxQuestions.org, and unlike LQ it will be decidedly NSFW. That said, head over to the Bad Voltage website, take a listen and let us know what you think.

–jeremy


Written by jeremy

April 30th, 2015 at 8:19 am

Posted in Bad Voltage

WordCamp Finland 2015 brings WordPress enthusiasts together

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WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress, the free and open source personal publishing software that powers over 75 million sites on the web.

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In May of 2015, WordCamp will finally have its debut in Finland. The event is set to take place at the home base of Seravo in Tampere.

WordCamps come in all different flavours, based on the local communities that produce them. In general, WordCamps include sessions on how to use WordPress more effectively, plugin and theme development, advanced techniques and security. Conference talks can also dig into such topics as how WordPress can be used in marketing or media businesses.

WordCamps are attended by people ranging from blogging newbies to professional WordPress developers and consultants, and usually combine scheduled programming with unconference sessions and other activities.

The first WordCamp was organised in San Francisco by Matt Mullenweg in 2006. Since then, local communities around the world have organised over three hundred WordCamps.

This year’s WordCamp Finland is held on May 8–9. The conference will bring together more than two hundred WordPress enthusiasts. Seravo is proud to participate by sponsoring the event and helping with the organising effort. The tickets to the event have already been sold out, but you can always participate in the discussions by following @WordCampFinland and #wcfi on Twitter.

See you there!

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More information: WordCamp Finland 2015

Written by sanna

April 30th, 2015 at 2:21 am

Android-x86 on IFC6410

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Documenting how to get Android-x86 up on an IFC6410.

Prep
0. Install repo.
1. Get the source. Shallow syncing to save space (full source >30G):

mkdir android-x86
cd android-x86
repo init --depth=1 -u http://git.android-x86.org/manifest -b kitkat-x86 -g default,arm,pdk,-darwin
repo sync -j16

Building

Compiling the kernel:

git clone https://git.linaro.org/landing-teams/working/qualcomm/kernel.git
git checkout -t origin/integration-linux-qcomlt
cd kernel
make ARCH=arm CROSS_COMPILE=~/devel/android-x86/prebuilts/gcc/linux-x86/arm/arm-eabi-4.6/bin/arm-eabi- qcom_defconfig
make -j16

The zImage needs to have a binary blob prepended to it to boot with the LK bootloader on IFC6410.

cat fixup.bin arch/arm/boot/zImage arch/arm/boot/dts/qcom-apq8064-ifc6410.dtb > zImage-dtb

Building Android-x86 requires JDK (see build requirements). I used JDK 7 on openSUSE, and needed a bunch of patches to get a successful build:

Single Patch:

This may be helpful when applying the first patch, since repo doesn’t support diff style patching.

The Qualcomm specific init scripts (not packaged with Android-x86) are available here.


git clone https://github.com/varadgautam/qualcomm-android-init.git ~/devel/qcom-android

cd android-x86/system/core

git apply ~/devel/qcom-android/android-x86-avoid-parentheses-from-fdt.patch

Building the source:

cd android-x86
source build/envsetup.sh
lunch mini_armv7a_neon-userdebug
make -j8 TARGET_PREBUILT_KERNEL=

This prepares the necessary images at `android-x86/out/target/product/armv7-a-neon`.

Preparing boot.img:

Extract the qualcomm-specific init scripts (for fstab partitions) into `android-x86/out/target/product/armv7-a-neon/root` for the ramdisk. These are taken from Linaro’s android-ifc6410.

cd android-x86/out/target/product/armv7-a-neon/root
mv ~/devel/qcom-android/init.* .
mv ~/devel/qcom/android/fstab.* .

# prepare initrd
find . | cpio -o -H newc | gzip > ../qcom-ramdisk.img

# make boot.img (= zImage + ramdisk)
# from armv7-a-neon:
abootimg --create qcom-boot.img -k  -r qcom-ramdisk.img -f ~/devel/qcom-android/bootimg.cfg

Preparing system_ext4.img

The system.img created isn’t ext4 formatted (shows as dBase IV DBT!), and init refuses to mount it as /system : (. Repacking:

dd if=/dev/zero of=system_ext4.img bs=4K count=100000  # large enough
mkfs.ext4 system_ext4.img
sudo tune2fs -c0 -i0 system_ext4.img
mkdir system-ext4
mount -o loop system_ext4.img system-ext4/
cp -v -r -p system/* system-ext4/
umount system-ext4/

Flashing images:

Boot IFC6410 into fastboot mode by holding SW4 during power up.

fastboot flash boot qcom-boot.img
fastboot flash system system_ext4.img
fastboot continue

Reboot with a UART cable attached to get serial console.


Written by Varad

April 29th, 2015 at 12:08 pm

Posted in android,freedreno,X.Org

Freedreno on Android – Overview

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I’m working on adding Freedreno support to Android this summer with the X.org Foundation! This post documents the technical specifics of what I’ll be doing.

Android abstracts its hardware interfaces behind device-specific Hardware Abstraction Layers which can be customized by the vendors. The compositor, called SurfaceFlinger uses the Hardware Composer HAL to
1) decide if a layer must be processed through OpenGL/GPU (HWC_FRAMEBUFFER) or the SoC display controller (HWC_OVERLAY) during prepare().
2) handle VSYNCs through vsync().
3) select displays and provide modesetting.
The OpenGL composition pathway requires libEGL and libGLES to be present. In the absence of a HWC, all compositions use this pathway.

Buffer allocations happen through gralloc HAL, which uses an in-kernel memory manager to provide alloc() and free() calls. It allocates suitable buffers depending on the requested usage type. HWC and gralloc API documentation is available at hwcomposer.h and gralloc.h.
A KMS based HWC would reduce GPU dependency and improve performance by handling composition through the display controller.

This project targets providing a functional Android graphics path using DRM/KMS based gralloc and HWC with atomic pageflips using Freedreno/Mesa EGL/GLES running on upstream Android or Android-x86 on an IFC6410. A stretch goal is to have Freedreno support with an Android distro (CyanogenMod).

Implementation Plans:
I am starting with testing and fixing the existing bits and proceeding to interface HWC with KMS APIs to use the SoC display controller.

The libEGL and libGLES requirements would be provided using Mesa, similar to Android-x86. drm_gralloc support for Freedreno has been developed, but remains largely untested. The existing reference HWC implementation just uses eglSwapBuffers (i.e. GPU composition).

Initial task would be assembling these untested parts to run on the IFC6410. After fixing the issues discovered, we would have Freedreno running on Android, but *without* any modesetting support in place.

The project would then proceed to implementing the HWC with KMS APIs. A reference implementation exists using userspace fences – sw_sync, but atomic modesetting support within MSM kernel can provide a way to do away with these.

Resources:
Android Graphics Stack Requirements
Freedreno drm_gralloc in Android-x86


Written by Varad

April 29th, 2015 at 3:55 am

Freedreno on Android – Overview

without comments

I’m working on adding Freedreno support to Android this summer with the X.org Foundation! This post documents the technical specifics of what I’ll be doing.

Android abstracts its hardware interfaces behind device-specific Hardware Abstraction Layers which can be customized by the vendors. The compositor, called SurfaceFlinger uses the Hardware Composer HAL to
1) decide if a layer must be processed through OpenGL/GPU (HWC_FRAMEBUFFER) or the SoC display controller (HWC_OVERLAY) during prepare().
2) handle VSYNCs through vsync().
3) select displays and provide modesetting.
The OpenGL composition pathway requires libEGL and libGLES to be present. In the absence of a HWC, all compositions use this pathway.

Buffer allocations happen through gralloc HAL, which uses an in-kernel memory manager to provide alloc() and free() calls. It allocates suitable buffers depending on the requested usage type. HWC and gralloc API documentation is available at hwcomposer.h and gralloc.h.
A KMS based HWC would reduce GPU dependency and improve performance by handling composition through the display controller.

This project targets providing a functional Android graphics path using DRM/KMS based gralloc and HWC with atomic pageflips using Freedreno/Mesa EGL/GLES running on upstream Android or Android-x86 on an IFC6410. A stretch goal is to have Freedreno support with an Android distro (CyanogenMod).

Implementation Plans:
I am starting with testing and fixing the existing bits and proceeding to interface HWC with KMS APIs to use the SoC display controller.

The libEGL and libGLES requirements would be provided using Mesa, similar to Android-x86. drm_gralloc support for Freedreno has been developed, but remains largely untested. The existing reference HWC implementation just uses eglSwapBuffers (i.e. GPU composition).

Initial task would be assembling these untested parts to run on the IFC6410. After fixing the issues discovered, we would have Freedreno running on Android, but *without* any modesetting support in place.

The project would then proceed to implementing the HWC with KMS APIs. A reference implementation exists using userspace fences – sw_sync, but atomic modesetting support within MSM kernel can provide a way to do away with these.

Resources:
Android Graphics Stack Requirements
Freedreno drm_gralloc in Android-x86


Written by Varad

April 29th, 2015 at 2:57 am