LinuxPlanet Casts

Media from the Linux Moguls

Archive for the ‘hardware’ Category

mintCast 151: SolydXK

without comments

News: Clem details MDM login screens built with HTML5. (Blog.LinuxMint.com ) Canonical takes the lid off of Mir. (Phoronix.com ) HP to offer all-in-one Ubuntu computer for sale in UK. (OMGUbuntu.co.uk ) Steam for Linux continues to grow, challenges Steam … Continue reading

Written by mintcast@mintcast.org (Charles and Rothgar)

March 7th, 2013 at 8:05 am

Garage Broadcasting PT1 | In Depth Look

without comments

post thumbnail

Jupiter Broadcasting has a reach of millions, over seven hours of content produced a week, and all from a garage studio.

In this episode get a behind the scenes tour of Jupiter Broadcasting’s HD virtual studio.

Find out how, with a few tricks, Chris can turn around an 1+ hour HD episode in just a matter of hours. It’s all done live, and on a budget!

Direct Download:

HD Download | Mobile Download | MP3 Download | Ogg Download | YouTube

RSS Feeds:

HD Feed | Mobile Feed | MP3 Feed | Ogg Feed | iTunes HD Feed

Notes:

Previous Tours:
- Behind The Scenes of our HD Studio Part 1
- Behind The Scenes of our HD Studio Part 2
- Behind The Scenes of our HD Studio Part 3
- Behind The Scenes of our HD Studio Part 4

Gear:

Canon VIXIA HV40 HD HDV Camcorder w/10x Optical Zoom – 2009 MODEL

Price: $699.00

4.1 out of 5 stars (57 customer reviews)

14 used & new available from $350.00

Blackmagic Design Intensity Pro HDMI Editing Card with PCI Express

Price: $189.05

3.7 out of 5 stars (33 customer reviews)

9 used & new available from $149.99

Beachtek DX-A2T “Tough” Dual XLR Compact Audio Adapter for all Camcorders.

Price: $189.00

4.0 out of 5 stars (9 customer reviews)

8 used & new available from $150.00

Ultimate RAID | TechSNAP 24

without comments

post thumbnail

When your data is important, understanding RAID can make the difference between a major loss, or saving the day. We’ll break down the different types of RAID, and the setups we’ve found to work best!

All that and more, in this week’s TechSNAP.

Direct Download Links:

HD Video | Large Video | Mobile Video | MP3 Audio | OGG Audio | YouTube

Subscribe via RSS and iTunes:

Show Notes:


EFF to build early warning system for rouge SSL certificates


Adobe released out-of-band Flash fix for critical vulnerability


New SSL attack targets older versions of SSL and TLS

  • SSL 3.0 and TLS 1.0 are vulnerable to an attack that can disclose private data
  • The researchers proof of concept can be used against popular sites such as PayPal
  • The exploit requires the attacker to be in a ‘man-in-the-middle’ position, and uses a ‘chosen plain-text attack’ against the AES encryption algorithm often used by SSL/TLS.
  • The attack works by having malicious javascript inject known plain text into the encrypted data stream, offering the attackers a chosen plain text to target their cryptanalysis against.
  • Not all SSL implementations default to AES, OpenSSL prefers the Camellia cipher first, however, a man-in-the-middle attack could influence the list of allowable ciphers, causing AES to be chosen as the cipher suite.
  • The researchers have been working with browser vendors since May to develop a solution, however every proposed patch has been found to break compatibility with some major SSL appliance resulting in a number of major sites not being reachable over SSL. Thus far browser vendors have not resolved the issue.
  • The attack is relatively slow, and requires a MiTM position, so it not likely to result in the breakdown of all e-commerce, however, it could be used quite effectively against public wifi spots.
  • Interesting notes from my own research, Cipher Suite Preference Order:
  • PayPal
    • AES256-SHA
    • AES128-SHA
    • DES-CBC3-SHA
    • RC4-SHA
    • RC4-MD5
  • Google (Docs, Gmail)
    • RC4-SHA
    • RC4-MD5
    • AES256-SHA
    • DES-CBC3-SHA
    • AES128-SHA
  • Facebook
    • RC4-MD5
    • RC4-SHA
    • AES128-SHA
    • AES256-SHA
    • DES-CBC3-SHA
  • Hotmail
    • AES128-SHA
    • AES256-SHA
    • RC4-SHA
    • DES-CBC3-SHA
    • RC4-MD5
  • StarTrekOnline.com
    • AES256-SHA
    • AES128-SHA
    • DES-CBC3-SHA
    • DES-CBC-SHA
    • RC4-SHA
    • RC4-MD5
  • ScaleEngine.com (OpenSSL HIGH:!MD5)
    • DHE-RSA-CAMELLIA256-SHA, CAMELLIA256-SHA
    • DHE-RSA-CAMELLIA128-SHA, CAMELLIA128-SHA
    • DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA, AES256-SHA
    • DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA, AES128-SHA
    • EDH-RSA-DES-CBC3-SHA, DES-CBC3-SHA
  • None of these sites support SSLv2
  • Additional Article
  • Statistics shows that as many as 35% of SSL enabled sites are still vulnerable to a 2009 attack. Some sites purposely delay deploying SSL updates due to concerts about compatibility with outdated browsers, especially since SSL is used primary for e-commerce.

Intel integrates RealVNC at the BIOS level, allowing full remote access via the existing Intel vPro management engine

  • Intel has worked with RealVNC to embed a VNC Remote Frame Buffer server directly into the BIOS and vPro management chipset
  • Featuring include allowing you to remotely change BIOS settings, mount virtual images for reinstalling or repairing the OS, full remote-kvm features and remote reboot capability
  • The VNC access is secured using the existing on board encryption and certificate system built into the Intel vPro Management Engine Chipset.
  • vPro must be enabled, assigned an IP address and certificate (or strong password) in order to be used, so this will not expose unconfigured computers to the risk of being unintentionally remotely controlled.

Feedback:

Home Server Segment – Storage. There are many different types of RAID, a set of technologies that allow multiple independent physical disks to act as a single logical disk. The different types of RAID provide different advantages and disadvantages and have various uses.

  • RAID 0 – Striping
  • RAID 0 uses any number of disks and spreads the data between the disks, usually in blocks of 64 or 128kb. The total size of the logical disk will be N * smallest disk
  • This means that while reading and writing data, you have more physical heads doing the work, meaning that when read or writing a large amount of data, all of the disks can work in tandem, resulting in higher throughput
  • The disadvantage to RAID 0 is that there is no redundancy, if any one disk in the set fails to work, all data in the entire RAID array is no longer usable.
  • Common use cases for RAID 0 are things such as Video Editing that requires extremely high throughput rates
  • RAID 1 – Mirroring
  • RAID 1 is the most basic type of RAID, it requires an even number of disks. Each pair of disks contains identical information. The total size of the logical disk is N/2 * smallest disk.
  • When one of the two disks fails, the other contains exactly the same data, and the system can continue to operate. The failed disk can then be replaced, and the remaining disk has it’s data cloned to the new disk (this process is called Resilvering), restoring the system to full operational status.
  • RAID 1 can improve read performance because two heads can be seeking at the same time, however it cannot improve write performance, as both disks must write all changes made to the data
  • The disadvantage to RAID 1 is that you lose half of the storage capacity of the drives you put in to the array
  • RAID 1 is typically used for systems that require high fault tolerance, and the ability to continue to operate even during a disk failure
  • RAID 2 is not currently used, the original specification called for disks that would rotate and seek in unison and offer the possibility of higher transfer rates.
  • RAID 3 is similar to RAID 0, however instead of using large blocks, data is split between the drives at the byte level. This is very rare in practise because of the limited number of IOPS that most disks can handle, and the fact that RAID 3 suffers from a great loss of speed if more than 1 operation is run concurrently
  • RAID 4 works similar to RAID 5 below, except that it uses a dedicated parity disk
  • RAID 5
  • RAID 5 combines striping (RAID 0) with parity. This means that as each group of blocks is written, a parity block is calculated and written to one of the disks. This way, if any one of the disks were to fail, using the remaining blocks and the parity block, it would be possible to calculate what the missing block should be. The total size of the logical disk is N – 1 * smallest disk.
  • During operations, if a disk fails, the RAID array will be in what is know as ‘degraded’ mode, where the controller must do the calculations to determine what the missing data would be. This results in significantly lower performance. However the array can be restored to healthy status by replacing the failed disk, and allowing it to ‘resilver’ (the process of calculating each block of data that should exist on that drive, and writing it to the disk).
  • RAID 5 provides a the advantages of RAID 0 (speed, use of most of your disk capacity), while still providing some fault tolerance.
  • The parity data is storage spread across all of the disks, rather than always one one specific disk, for more even performance, because the parity calculation is
  • RAID 5 is typically used in servers where a large amount of storage and performance is required, but some degree of fault tolerance is also warranted. RAID 5 is rarely available on built-in RAID controllers due to the complexity of the parity calculations.
  • RAID 6
  • RAID 6 works like RAID 5 except with two copies of the parity information. The size of the logical disk is N–2 * the smallest disk
  • RAID 6 provides additional fault tolerance, specifically it allows the array to continue to operate if more than 1 disks fails at once, or if a second disk fails before the first can be resilvered. In a RAID 5 array, if a second disk dies before the first failed disk is completely restored, the entire array is lost.
  • RAID 6 is typically used in servers that require more storage and more fault tolerance than RAID 1 can provide, and where RAID 5 is just not enough fault tolerance. RAID 6 usually requires a rather expensive hardware controller.
  • Some complex controllers can allow you to do ‘nested raid levels’.
  • RAID 0+1
  • A mirrored array of two striped arrays, allowing both speed and fault tolerance
  • RAID 50
  • RAID 60
  • A stripped array of two RAID 6 arrays, providing additional performance on top of the fault tolerance and larger capacity of RAID 6. This setup is also common in setups where the RAID 6 arrays are on separate controllers.

Roundup

Bitcoin-Blaster:

Written by chris

September 22nd, 2011 at 9:58 pm

Amahi Server Review | LAS | s17e04

without comments

post thumbnail

We’ve got the ultimate Linux Home Server that is business up front, and all party in the back! Find out how this bolt on solution can revolutionize an otherwise lame-duck system!

THEN – Adobe Air is dropping support for Linux, find out why Adobe ushering in their own demise!

All this week on, The Linux Action Show!


Thanks to:

GoDaddy.com Use our codes LINUX to save 10% at checkout, or LINUX20 to save 20% on hosting!

Direct Episode Download Links:

HD Video | Large Video | Mobile Video | MP3 | OGG Audio | OGG Video | YouTube


Episode Show Notes:

Runs Linux:
Fanless PC has two expansion slots, Runs Linux

Android Pick:
Friday
Android Picks so far, thanks to Madjo in the IRC Chat room
http://bit.ly/LASAndroidPicks

Linux Pick:
Freeciv

NEWS:

Adobe Abandons Air for Linux
No more doubt: Oracle wants billion-dollar amount from Google
The story behind the mysterious CyanogenMod update
Formally Launching the MeeGo Community Device Program
ownCloud 2.0 just merged (with screenshots)
This Week in Linux Dude loses his Google Ads



Amah Home Server REVIEW:
Amahi Home Server – Making Home Networking Simple
Amahi Home Server Requirements
Fedora Express CD – Amahi
Feature Gallery for the Amahi Home Server

Find us on Twitter:
twitter.com/BryanLunduke
twitter.com/ChrisLAS

Follow the network on Facebook:
facebook.com/jupiterbroadcasting

Catch the show LIVE at 10am on Sunday:
http://jblive.tv

Download & Comment:

Amahi Server Review | LAS | s17e04

without comments

post thumbnail

We’ve got the ultimate Linux Home Server that is business up front, and all party in the back! Find out how this bolt on solution can revolutionize an otherwise lame-duck system!

THEN – Adobe Air is dropping support for Linux, find out why Adobe ushering in their own demise!

All this week on, The Linux Action Show!


Thanks to:

GoDaddy.com Use our codes LINUX to save 10% at checkout, or LINUX20 to save 20% on hosting!

Direct Episode Download Links:

HD Video | Large Video | Mobile Video | MP3 | OGG Audio | OGG Video | YouTube


Episode Show Notes:

Runs Linux:
Fanless PC has two expansion slots, Runs Linux

Android Pick:
Friday
Android Picks so far, thanks to Madjo in the IRC Chat room
http://bit.ly/LASAndroidPicks

Linux Pick:
Freeciv

NEWS:

Adobe Abandons Air for Linux
No more doubt: Oracle wants billion-dollar amount from Google
The story behind the mysterious CyanogenMod update
Formally Launching the MeeGo Community Device Program
ownCloud 2.0 just merged (with screenshots)
This Week in Linux Dude loses his Google Ads



Amah Home Server REVIEW:
Amahi Home Server – Making Home Networking Simple
Amahi Home Server Requirements
Fedora Express CD – Amahi
Feature Gallery for the Amahi Home Server

Find us on Twitter:
twitter.com/BryanLunduke
twitter.com/ChrisLAS

Follow the network on Facebook:
facebook.com/jupiterbroadcasting

Catch the show LIVE at 10am on Sunday:
http://jblive.tv

Download & Comment:

Encryption Best Practices | TechSNAP 10

without comments

post thumbnail

Coming up on this episode of TechSNAP:

We follow up on last week’s bitcoin coverage with scandal that has a $500k price tag.

Then – We launch into your questions, and cover encryption best practices to keep your data safe!

Plus – We take our first live war story call, all that and more on this week’s TechSNAP!


Direct Download Links:

HD Video | Large Video | Mobile Video | MP3 Audio | OGG Audio | YouTube

Subscribe via RSS and iTunes:

Show Notes:

TechSNAP has a new Sub-Reddit, submit links and questions for the show, and vote away!


Topic: Bitcoin wallet stolen (25,000 coins worth ~$500,000 USD)

  • Bitcoin wallets work by using public/private key pairs
  • Each wallet, by default, has 100 keys, and you allocate them as needed, and then new ones are generated so that you always have 100 ready for use
  • If someone manages to steal your wallet.dat file, they have the private keys for your addresses that contain the coins, and they can cryptographically sign a transaction using that private key, and therefore transfer the coins
  • User who had their coins stolen admits that they found spyware/malware on their computer. Possibly also a trojan
  • The attack also accessed the users account at a mining pool, and changed the destination address for payouts (some pools off the option to lock this address so that i can never be changed)
  • Bitcoin transactions are irreversible and there is no central authority to settle disputes or forcibly undo a transaction (This is both a feature and a flaw, it is a trade off to allows BTC transactions to avoid many forms of interference)

How to protect your wallet file:

  • Use separate wallet files, and don’t keep all of your money in one place.
  • Backup your wallet file regularly. The wallet file contains the private keys that actually control the coins, without them, you cannot transfer the coins. If you totally lose your wallet file without a backup, those coins are lost to everyone forever.
  • Your backups of your wallet file must be recent, because of the ‘100 key buffer’, that your wallet file has, if your backup is more than 100 transactions old, it will not contain the keys used for the newer transactions, and you will not be able to control those coins. Make sure you backup your wallet file on a regular basis. You can also adjust the configuration of your client to created a larger key buffer.
  • Your wallet file is the same as your GPG key ring, protect it as best you can. It should be stored in an encrypted volume (like a TrueCrypt mount or a GBDE file system) . It might also be advisable to run the bitcoin client as a dedicated user with much more locked down permissions on your machine.
  • As we learned from this incident, and the banking trojan news last week, it is imperative that you ensure that no one is logging your keystrokes, sniffing your traffic, or remotely controlling your machine (a remote control trojan such as the ZeuS banking worm, would be able to access your truecrypt partition when you mount it to use your bitcoin wallet)

mybitcoin.com – The bitcoin bank Chris is “trying”.

BITCOIN BLASTER:

- Our current Mining efforts -

Allan:
It all started with the dual GPUs in my gaming machine and the spare cycles on some of my servers, but CPUs and older nVidia cards were just not worth the power and effort with the higher difficulty.

So, a two friends and I have built a dedicated mining rig (2×5870, 1×6950) that is doing over 1100 Mh/s with a bit of overclocking. Sadly, the difficulty jump came only a few hours after we got the machine online, and it cut the profitability down. We are looking at another more expensive machine, but this will mean a longer wait for ROI.

Chris:
I’m pushing about 500 – 600 Mh/s during the day, nearing 810 MH/s at night. I plan to add two more moderately powerful ATI cards in the next week.

I bought my first physical good, a video card to mine some more. Using a “service” to convert bitcoins to Amazon gift-cards: http://www.bitcoinredemption.com/


FEEDBACK:

Q: (Michal) Is there a way for me to tell if my machine has been compromised while I was asleep?
A: Yes, using an application such as Tripware, or the Verification system in some backup software (Bacula, etc), allows you to detect which files have been changed since the last time the tool was run (ie, you run it daily). This way, when an important system file is changed, you are notified, if you did not cause this change (OS or package update/install), then it is possible someone has successfully compromised your system and modified important system files.


Q: (Dale) Is continuing to use Dropbox safe if i use TrueCrypt to encrypt my files before uploading them?
A: While it is theoretically safe to store your encrypted files in dropbox, because of the way dropbox works (copy on write deduplication), you would have to reupload the entire TrueCrypt volume every time you changed a file (because of the nature of the encryption, the changes to the encrypted volume will also be bigger). Unless you only store some very small files, or are using separate TrueCrypt volumes for each file you are storing, this will quickly get unwieldy and slow.


Q: (Michal) How can I store my users’ files such that they are encrypted with the users’ password, but can still be recovered if the password is lost/forgotten
A: The short answer is that you cannot. Strong cryptography does not have any recovery method. If you want the files to be truly secure, then they need to be able to be accessed by only a single key, and if that key is lost, the files are lost. The only real option is to encrypt the files to two different keys, one of the user, and one of the ‘Recovery Agent’, the person responsible for decrypting the files if the user loses their key. This lowers the security of the encrypted files, because the Recovery Agent can decrypt the files without the users’ permission.


Q: (Justin) How secure is it to enable to ‘text a password reset token to your mobile phone’ in gmail?
A: Mostly that depends on how secure your phone is. Does it display part of the text message when it comes in? How quickly does your phone lock it self when it is inactive. Can your unlock code be reset? How many other people have your unlock code? How easily can the unlock code be defeated? It is really up to you to decide how secure you feel your phone is. I for one, just don’t lose my passwords :p


Q: (brotherlu) What is the difference between a NAS and a SAN. Also in which environments would you use each.
A: a NAS (Network Attached Storage) is a dedicated storage device that you connect to your network. a SAN (Storage Area Network) is a dedicated network for storage devices. Usually SANs are much higher performance and sometimes use technologies other than ethernet. Really, it depends how much performance you need, SANs are much more expensive.


Grab bag bonus links:
Senate Bill Requires Permission to Collect & Share Location Data
LulzSec’s busy week:
Senate website, CIA.gov hacked. LulzSec claims responsibility.
LulzSec opens hack request line
LulzSec takes Eve Online and Minecraft offline
Ex-Googler Calls Out Google Infrastructure as Obsolete
Sophisticated Cyberattack Is Reported by the I.M.F.


Download:

Backups & Server Hardware | TechSNAP 6

without comments

post thumbnail

Every six hours the NSA collects as much data that exists in the entire lib of congress and we have a few practical notes on how a system like that could even function.

We follow up on Dropbox, and what looks like the FTC is getting involved with their recent snafus.

Plus we answer a big batch of your emails, and our backup tips for home, small business, and the enterprise!

Please send in more questions so we can continue doing the Q&A section every week! techsnap@jupiterbroadcasting.com


Direct Download Links:

HD Video | Large Video | Mobile Video | MP3 Audio | OGG Audio | YouTube

Subscribe via RSS and iTunes:

Show Notes:

Topic: NSA collects data on a massive scale

NSA Gathers 4x the Amount of Info than the Library of Congress, Daily

  • NSA gathers data at an incredible rate, equivalent to the entire content of the US Library of Congress every 6 hours.
  • The Library of congress contains nearly 150,000,000 catalogued entries.
  • The Library of congress ‘American Memory’ site contains tens of petabytes of public domain images and audio/video recordings.
  • The NSA has the ability to apply for patents under a gag-order, if and only if another entity tries to patent the same process, do the NSA patents become public. NSA patents never expire.
  • http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect2=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&d=PALL&RefSrch=yes&Query=PN%2F6947978 – the NSA patented the geo-location by pinging a series of routers technique we discussed a few weeks ago during the iPhone GPS story.


Topic: new US Internet censorship bill, the ‘PROTECT IP’ Act

Revised ‘Net censorship bill requires search engines to block sites, too
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2011/04/google-private-web-censorship-lawsuits-would-create-trolls.ars

  • Law is in part about attacking foreign sites that US law enforcement currently cannot target
  • Proposes to require search engines to remove results for sites as the request of not only the government, but also of rights holders. Have we not seen enough false positives and trolling via the DMCA?
  • rights holders would not have to seek government assistance to have sites censored, but could seek court orders directly against payment processors and advertising networks (but not ISPs or search engines)
  • actively encourages search engines and other sites to take action without any sort of court order
  • Act will protect ad networks and payment processors from being sued by the customers they spurn if they “voluntarily cease doing business with infringing websites, outside of any court ordered action”. The definition of infringing is left up to the rights holder.

Book recommendation: The Master Switch (Audio Book / Audible Sign up)


Topic: Lieing about security for a competitive edge

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2011/05/dropbox-ftc/
http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/threatlevel/2011/05/dropbox-ftc-complaint-final.pdf

  • A complaint has been filed with the Federal Trade Commission claiming that Dropbox engaged in Deceptive Trade Practices by claiming to securely store your data when they in fact do not store it according to industry best practices.
  • It is the belief of the complainant that the security claims made by dropbox gave them a competitive advantage over other services, specifically, users might have chosen a more secure service if they were aware of the problems with dropbox
  • At issue is a specific claim from the dropbox website that has since been retracted when it was discovered that it was false. “All files stored on Dropbox servers are encrypted (AES-256) an are inaccessible without your account password.”
  • Because Dropbox uses only a single AES-256 key, rather than a separate one for each user, employees and others at Dropbox may access your files at any time without your password. The Dropbox page has been updated to reflect the fact that Dropbox will turn over your files if requested by law enforcement or possibly other parties.

Topic: Q&A

Q: (akito) What do data centers use for fire suppression now that Halon is frowned upon?
A: Some data centers still use Halon, however most have switched to using ‘clean agents’ such as FM-200 that are designed to remove the ‘heat’ from a fire. Unlike other agents, FM-200 does not leave an oily residue or otherwise degrade your equipment. Some systems use CO2 to displace the oxygen in the space and suppress the fire that way. Also 3M has developed a non-conductive fluid that can be used in place of Halon without damaging equipment.
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/Novec/Home/Product_Information/Fire_Protection/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iz4o3W6IJM

War Story: No means none, not even a little bit

(Allan) Interesting story from when I worked at Ontario Power Generation. There was a problem with one of the CRAC (Computer Room Air Conditioner) units in the on-site data center, and a refrigeration technician was dispatched. Before we let him into the server room we specifically told him that he must come to us before he started any kind of soldering or welding, as it would set off the fire suppression system, which thankfully no longer flooded the room with Halon, but still triggered an emergency shutdown of all electrical systems in the entire IT wing of the North Admin building. Basically, when a fire is detected by the system, the klaxon sounds and you have 30 seconds to silence the alarm before it is escalated, at which time the power is cut and Halon (if it had not been disabled) would be deployed. I was down the hall from the server room in one of the test labs, working on the windows NT4 to Win2000 migration. Out of nowhere, the fire alarm goes off; At first I was startled, then it clicked, the repairman had forgotten to warn us that he was going to begin soldering. I took off at a dead run towards the alarm panel, as I got closer I heard the alarm tone change, I only had 10 seconds left before the power to every server would be cut and the UPS system would be bypassed. We’d spend hours cleaning up the mess, and explaining what went wrong. Thankfully, I reached the panel in time, and jammed the big red silence button, saving the day.

Q: (DreamsVoid) I would like to backup my linux and windows computers to my linux server using rsync. How should I set this up
A: rsync has many advantages, specifically the way it can compute the delta between files and significantly reduce the amount of data that has to be transferred during a backup. However, rsync is not a good backup solution because it only creates a copy of the file, not a true backup. In a true backup system, you retain multiple versions of each file from different dates. Say for example a file is corrupted, if you do not notice this right away, during the next rsync, the ‘backup’ copy of the file will be replaced with the corrupted one, and you will have no recourse. If all of your computers are on a LAN, you don’t have any real worries about the amount of bandwidth you are using transferring the files, and a proper backup solution is best.

rsync for windows: http://itefix.no/cwrsync/
BackupPC – open source backup to disk: http://backuppc.sourceforge.net/
Bacula – high end open source network backup system: http://www.bacula.org

Q: (Nean) What are the differences between a server and a normal desktop computer?
A: Generally they are not all that different, but some servers have additional features and capabilities that are not necessary in a regular desktop. Typically, higher end servers have redundant power supplies, either because they need to draw more power than a single power supply can provide, but also to be able to continue operating in the event that one of the power supplies dies. Servers, and some high end desktops also have redundant disks, taking advantage of various RAID configurations to allow the server to continue operating even if one or more disks stop functioning. Servers typically have dedicated RAID controllers that support more exotic forms of RAID than your typical on-board controller found it high end desktops. Servers also tend to have remote management cards that allow an administrator to access the bios and even manipulate the keyboard/mouse remotely, instead of having to be local to the machine.


Download:

Written by chris

May 23rd, 2011 at 2:20 am