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Media from the Linux Moguls

HPR1712: What’s in my Crate

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Back in the summer of 2014 I started going to the Surrey Linux User Group. I was asked to give a short presentation about Linux accessibility and how, although I am totally blind, I still write code and muck about with Linux. I was then asked to give the same presentation at the Portsmouth LUG. This time I made it more comprehensive and took more kit. So I take this opportunity to give my version of the "What's in my bag" shows that some folks have been doing. As I am unemployed, like a lot of blind folks, I have been unable to justify this before now because I don't lug an interesting collection of stuff to and from work. Here's a simple bullet list about the crate and it's contents: The crate is a 35 litre capacity 'Really Useful Box' First in were 2 Dell Latitude D630 (64-bit) laptops Next in was a Dell Inspiron (32-bit) laptop, clunky and slow The three laptops were sandwhiched between 3-ply layers of bubble-wrap Next in was a Seika 40-cell refreshable Braille display Next was a clear polycarbonate, zip-up pencil case stuffed with audio leads Then a 'Mesh' Bluetooth and line-in external speaker And a Braun external speaker/FM radio/micro-SD boom-box A four-way mains power splitter The three AC adaptors for the laptops On the top of the box, because it was too wide to go in, was a USB keyboard Mobile phone charging battery 'brick', for the Raspberry Pi A Raspberry Pi, a Banana Pi and some Arduino bits and pieces Here's what I demonstrated with two of the laptops: Trisquel Linux and accessibility in the Gnome desktop with Orca Accessibility in the console with Debian and the Braille display on the Inspiron The second Latitude was with me so I could get some sighted help with BIOS settings. My thanks have to go to Tony Wood for the lift to and from both of these accessibility presentations. I could not have done either, especially the Portsmouth one without his help. Thanks also to Lisi, the coordinator of the Portsmouth LUG and to the folks of that LUG for their enthusiasm. Here's the link to the HPR show about my Raspberry Pi tts code fix: http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps.php?id=1649

Written by Mike Ray

February 23rd, 2015 at 6:00 pm

Posted in Linux

Accounts Percievable | CR 142

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Mike and Chris start the show by sharing some hard learned advice, and discussing the events of the last two weeks.

Then we touch on SuperFish, Ubuntu Touch, and more!

Written by Jupiter Broadcasting

February 23rd, 2015 at 5:19 pm

Posted in Linux

HPR1711: Problems with video software in Linux

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Cheese: Guvcviewer:

Written by swift110

February 22nd, 2015 at 6:00 pm

Posted in Linux

Retro Blasted Action | LAS 353

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Join us as we revisit some retro topics from the archives!

Written by chris@linuxactionshow.com

February 22nd, 2015 at 10:08 am

Posted in Linux

Episode-025

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Written by Kevin Wisher

February 21st, 2015 at 11:56 am

Posted in Linux,podcast

Chris’ Lifestyle Reboot | Tech Talk Today 137

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We round off the week’s tech news & follow up on the big Lenovo story & discuss HP’s push into Linux powered Networking.

Then Chris share’s the start of his lifestyle reboot & then a in depth discussion on getting into the IT job market.

Written by Jupiter Broadcasting

February 20th, 2015 at 1:46 pm

Posted in Linux

Going Linux #269 · What to do when things go wrong on Linux-Advanced

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Going Linux #269 · What to do when things go wrong on Linux-Advanced

In our advanced look at what to do when things go wrong on Linux, we describe reinstalling GRUB, using TestDisk to recover deleted partitions, and using BootRepair for a one-button fix for boot problems.

Episode 269 Time Stamps
00:00 Going Linux #269 · What to do when things go wrong on Linux-Advanced
00:15 Introduction
07:28 Reinstall GRUB
10:24 TestDisk
19:45 Using bootable BootRepair media
22:32 Using BootRepair from a bootable Linux distro
27:42 goinglinux.com, goinglinux@gmail.com, +1-904-468-7889, @goinglinux, feedback, listen, subscribe
28:42 End

Written by Larry Bushey

February 20th, 2015 at 2:00 am

Posted in Linux

SuperFishy Mistake | TechSNAP 202

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Lenovo PCs ship with man-in-the-middle adware that breaks HTTPS connections, we’ll break down how this is possible, the danger that still exists & more.

Plus the story of a billion dollar cyber heist anyone could pull off, the Equation group, your questions, our answers & much much more!

Written by Jupiter Broadcasting

February 19th, 2015 at 7:29 pm

Posted in Linux

HPR1710: Windows Remote Desktop on GNU/Linux

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Recorded using Easy Voice Recorder Pro I wrote a bash script to connect to various different windows servers from my GNU/Linux desktops. I had a few different requirements: I should be able to call it based on hostname. All windows should be 90% smaller than my screen. It should map my keyboard. It should map my local disk. It should quickly timeout if the port is not available. You can get the full script here, but let’s walk through it: The first line calls bash and then gets the server name from the symlink that is calling the script. The port is set as “3389”, but you can change that if you like. 123#!/bin/bashSERVER=`basename $0`PORT="3389" The next few lines finds the smallest vertical and horizontal sizes, even if you are running multiple screens. Then it calculates 90% of that to use as the size. 123h=$(echo "scale=0;(($(xrandr | grep '*+' | sed 's/x/ /g' | awk '{print $1}' | sort -n | head -1 )/100)*90)" | bc)v=$(echo "scale=0;(($(xrandr | grep '*+' | sed 's/x/ /g' | awk '{print $2}' | sort -n | head -1 )/100)*90)" | bc)SIZE=${h}x${v} Next we set the default username and password. I have it ask me for my password but I put it in here as an example. 123PASSWORD='defaultpassword'USERNAME='administrator'WORKGROUP='workgroup' In some cases the credentials may be different, so I have a case statement that will cycle through the servers and apply the differences. Depending on your naming schemes you may be able to use regular expressions here to filter out groups of servers. 1234567891011121314151617181920case "${SERVER}" in  *server*) echo "Server ${SERVER}"    PASSWORD='work_password'    USERNAME='administrator'    WORKGROUP='WORKGROUP'    ;;   *colo*) echo "Server ${SERVER}"    PASSWORD='colo_server_password'    USERNAME='administrator'    WORKGROUP='COLODOMAIN'    ;;       some_server ) echo "Server ${SERVER}"    PASSWORD='some_server_password'    USERNAME='some_server_password'    ;;  *) echo "No match for ${SERVER}, using defaults"    ;;esac Next we use an inbuilt bash command to see if a remote port is open and timeout after one second. 1timeout 1 bash -c "echo >/dev/tcp/${SERVER}/${PORT}" I used to connect to rdp using the program rdesktop, but it is now of limited value due to the fact that there are many open bugs that are not getting fixed. Bugs such as Bug 1075697 - rdesktop cannot connect to systems using RDP version 6 or newer  and Bug 1002978 - Failed to negotiate protocol, retrying with plain RDP . I then switch to using xfreerdp. This is the client that is behind remmina. You can use xfreerdp /kbd-list to get a list of the available keyboard layouts. 123456if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then  echo "${SERVER}:${PORT} is open"  xfreerdp /v:${SERVER} /size:${SIZE} /kbd-type:0x00000409 /t:${SERVER} /d:${WORKGROUP} /u:${USERNAME} /p:${PASSWORD} /a:drive,pc,/ /cert-ignore &else  echo "${SERVER}:${PORT} is closed"fi Next you will need to be sure that your host names are available, either in dns or in your /etc/hosts/ file. For example: 10.1.0.1 server1 10.1.0.2 server2 10.1.0.3 server3 10.2.0.1 coloserver1 10.2.0.2 coloserver2 10.2.0.3 coloserver3 192.168.1.1 some_server Edit the script to your liking and then put it into your a directory in your path, possibly /usr/local/bash or ~/bin/. You can then make symbolic links to the servers to the bash script, also in a directory in your path, using the command: ln -s /usr/local/bash/rdp.bash ~/bin/some_server chmod +x ~/bin/some_server Which links the global rdp.bash script to your personal symlink, and makes it executable. All that you need to do then is type the name of the server and a rdp screen should pop up. In our example: $ some_server From there your Windows Server session should pop up.

Written by Ken Fallon

February 19th, 2015 at 6:00 pm

Posted in Linux

Noah’s L2ARC | BSD Now 77

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This week on the show, we'll be chatting with Alex Reece and Matt Ahrens about what's new in the world of OpenZFS. After that, we're starting a new tutorial series on submitting your first patch. All the latest BSD news and answers to your emails, coming up on BSD Now - the place to B.. SD.

Written by Jupiter Broadcasting

February 19th, 2015 at 2:11 pm

Posted in Linux