LinuxPlanet Casts

Media from the Linux Moguls

State of the Obvious 2015 | Unfilter 130

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Obama gives his sixth state of the Union, we fact check in real time & listen for key issues like Cyber security.

It’s a once a year special edition of the Unfilter show, we throw out the playbook!

Written by Jupiter Broadcasting

January 21st, 2015 at 1:35 am

Posted in Linux

Building a Better Gnome | LUP 76

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Christian Hergert the creator of Gnome Builder joins us to discuss his projects funding campaign, quitting his full time job to work on open source & answering a major concern of developers looking to target Linux.

Ubuntu announces their Internet of Things OS, we’re a bit skeptical & Linus takes a firm stance on public disclosure of vulnerabilities and Kernel documentation.

Written by Jupiter Broadcasting

January 20th, 2015 at 9:14 pm

Posted in Linux

HPR1688: Some useful tools when compiling software

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introduction Hi this is Rho`n and welcome to my first submission to Hacker Public Radio. I have been working on an application using the Python programming language with the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) libraries for the GUI interface. After acquiring a new laptop and installing a fresh copy of Ubuntu on it, I decided to set up the build environment I needed to be able to work on my project. I have been building from source the EFL libraries along with the Python-EFL wrapper libraries. For the last couple machines on which I have built the software, I would use the standard configure, make, and make install procedure. This time around I decided to create a debian package to use for installing the libraries. It had been a few years since I had created a .deb, so I googled for some tutorials, and found mention of the checkinstall program. After reading a couple blog posts about it I decided to try it out. checkinstall is run instead of "make install" , and will create a .deb file, and then install the newly created package. cut and tr commands To help speed up the configure process, I had previously created a file from my other builds that is a grep of my history for all the various "apt get install" commands of the libraries the EFL software needs to compile. Since my current operating system was a freshly installed distribution of Ubuntu, I needed to install the build-essential package first. After looking through my install file, and I decided to create a single apt-get install line with all the packages listed, instead of running each of the installs seperately. I knew I could grep the file, and then pass that to awk or sed, but my skill with either isn't that great. I did a little searching to see what other tools were out there and found the cut command and the tr command. Cut lets you print part of a line. You can extract set a field delimeter with the -d option and then list a range of fields to be printed with the -f option. The tr command can replace a character. I used this to replace the new line character that was printed by the cut command to generate a single line of packages which I piped to a file. A quick edit of the file to add "sudo apt-get install" at the beginning, add execute permissions to the file, and now I have a nice, easy way to install all the needed libraries. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/15580144/concatenate-many-lines-of-output-to-one-line https://stackoverflow.com/questions/7857090/awk-extract-specific-columns-from-delimited-file apt-file and checkinstall At least that was the idea. After installing the libraries, and running configure, I still received errors that libraries were missing. The machines from which my list of libraries was generated, had all been used for various development purposes, so some needed libraries were already installed on them, and so their installation had passed out of my history. Besides echoing to standard out the file configure can't find, it also creates a log file: config.log. Between the two it is relatively easy to figure out what library is needed. Often the libraries needed included their name in the .deb which has to be installed, and finding them is easy with an apt-cache search and grep of the library name. The hardest ones to find were often the X11 based references. In this case, I needed the scrnsaver.h header file. After googling, I found a reference to the needed package (libxss-dev) on Stack Exchange. The answer also showed how to use the apt-file command to determine in which package a file is included. I wish I had run into this before, there a few times where it took a number of searches on the internet to figure out which package I needed to install, and "apt-file find" would have saved time and frustration. A very handy tool for anyone developing on a debian based distribution. As it turns out, that was the last dependency that needed resolved. After a successful configure, and successful compile using the make command, I was ready to try out checkinstall. Running sudo checkinstall, brings up a series of questions about your package, helping you fill out the needed .deb meta-data. I filled out my name and email, name for the package, short description of the package, and let everything else go to the suggested defaults. After, that hit enter and checkinstall will create a debian package and install it for you. If you run "apt-cache search <name of package>" you will see it listed, and "apt-cache show <name of package>" will give you the details you created for the package. There are warnings on the Ubuntu wiki not to use this method for packages to be included in an archive or in a ppa. It does work great for a local install, and would use it to install on machines on my local network. http://askubuntu.com/questions/554724/compile-workrave-from-source http://community.linuxmint.com/tutorial/view/162 http://www.falkotimme.com/howtos/checkinstall/ https://help.ubuntu.com/community/CheckInstall conclusion After a short side trip into development setup, I'm back writing my application on my new laptop. While I am a big fan of binary packages, Debian being the first GNU/Linux distribution I ever used, sometimes you need to dive in and compile software from source. For me running configure, make, make install has been the easiest way to do this, and these days it usually isn't too difficult to get even moderately complex applications and libraries to build. The most tedious part can be resolving all the dependencies. Now, with apt-file in my tool belt, it will be even faster and easier. I will also be using checkinstall for future compiles. I do like being able to use package management tools to install, and un-install software. I hope others find these tools useful. I have posted links in the show notes to the pages about cut, tr, apt-file and checkinstall that led me to these tools. If you've made it this far, thanks for listening to my first post to HPR. As Ken Fallon points out, it's not an HPR episode until you have uploaded it to the server. So let those episode ideas flow from your brain, into your favorite recording device, and up to the HPR server. Let's keep HPR active, vibrant, and a part of our lives for years to come.

Written by Rho`n

January 20th, 2015 at 6:00 pm

Posted in Linux

Amazon Treks On | Tech Talk Today 119

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Amazon is making movies for the theaters with a faster release online master plan, but could this sink Prime streaming?

Plus how the NSA takes over botnets without a trace & hacks the hackers.

Written by Jupiter Broadcasting

January 20th, 2015 at 4:54 pm

Posted in Linux

Going Linux #267 · What to do when things go wrong on Linux-Introduction

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Going Linux #267 · What to do when things go wrong on Linux-Introduction

Listener Dave suggested this topic. We detail how to recover from a crashed or frozen system. The topics we outline are: How to restart the Cinnamon desktop environment, how to restart the display server, how to restart and how to shut down a partially crashed responsive computer, and how to restart and shut down a completely unresponsive computer. We also walk through recovering accidentally deleted files from your hard drive or removable drive.

Episode 267 Time Stamps
00:00 Going Linux #267 · What to do when things go wrong on Linux-Introduction
00:17 Introduction
00:48 Just Larry
02:38 Examples from Linux Mint
03:33 How to restart Cinnamon
05:35 How to restart X
10:14 How to restart a responsive computer from the command line
12:38 How to shut down a responsive computer from the command line
13:46 How to restart an unresponsive computer
18:05 How to force shut down an unresponsive computer
20:26 How to recover accidentally deleted files
25:52 Using PhotoRec step-by-step
35:11 goinglinux.com, goinglinux@gmail.com, +1-904-468-7889, @goinglinux, feedback, listen, subscribe
36:30 End

Written by Larry Bushey

January 20th, 2015 at 2:00 am

Posted in Linux

HPR1687: Podcast recommendations

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Linux / Floss Podcasts Dudmonovi: Wish it was still going. I really like Dude Man's ideas. (http://feeds.feedburner.com/DudmanoviBlogAboutEverything) Floss Weekly: I skip some of these because they do not apply to something I would use. (http://leo.am/podcasts/floss/) GNU World Order: Klaatu is pretty similar to me. (http://gnuworldorder.info/ogg.xml) HPR: Obviously (http://hackerpublicradio.org/hpr_rss.php) Health Nutz: Not specifically Linux related, but the guys come from the community and who doesn't need to look after their health. (http://feeds.feedburner.com/podnutz/healthnutz) Kernal Panic Oggcast: Good general news. (http://kernelpanicoggcast.net/rss.php) The Linux Link Tech Show: Pretty light on Linux content these days, but I typically enjoy the conversation. (http://www.thelinuxlink.net/tllts/tllts.rss) Linux Voice: companion to the magazine (http://www.linuxvoice.com/podcast_ogg.rss) Linux Lug Cast: Frequently on the show (http://feeds.feedburner.com/linuxlugcast/JZUx) Open Source Musicians Podcast: Although I don't do much with audio production these days I still enjoy listening to it and hoping that one day I'll have time to get back into it. (http://opensourcemusician.libsyn.com/rss) Linux Action Show and Linux Unplugged: I've been suprised with the quality of Jupiter Broadcasting shows recently. I had dropped this show for a long time but I have recently begun listening to it again. (http://feeds.feedburner.com/computeractionshowvideo) (http://feeds.feedburner.com/linuxunogg) Linux Outlaws: May it rest in peace. This is the podcast that got me started in Linux. Without it I would still be using Macs....shudder. (http://feeds.feedburner.com/linuxoutlaws) Pop Culture General Podcasts Podculture: Local folks who talk about nerdy things. (http://www.podculture.com/feed/) The Mindrobbers: This show is run by a writer from my gernal area named Scott Carelli. I orginially heard of him through Podculture. I've followed his various podcasts for many years and this is the most recent incarnation. Although sometimes I don't always agree with his opinions I do always look forward to hearing them. (http://www.mindrobber.net/feed/) Trekcast: My first undying love in this world is Star Trek. (http://trekcast.podbean.com/feed/) The Doctor's Companion: Another podcast by Scott Carelli and gang. Good American centreic view of Doctor Who, another of my favorite shows. (http://www.thedoctorscompanion.us/?feed=rss2) The Babylon Podcast: This show isn;t in production anymore, but if you are a fan of Babylon 5 (which I am) this is a great show that breaks down each episode, and interviews many of the stars from the show. (http://www.babylonpodcast.com/category/shows/feed/) Fear the Boot: A great tabletop role playing game podcast (http://www.feartheboot.com/ftb/?feed=rss2) Hiyaa Martial Arts Podcast: Must listening for martial artists (especially of the chinese martial arts persuasion). There are very few good martial arts podcasts out there that are not style specific. This fits the bill. One of the host practices the same style of kung fu that I do (although through a different branch of the family tree) and it's nice to see that perspective on other arts. (http://feeds.feedburner.com/HiyaaMartialArtsPodcast) This American Life: NPR.. used to be an addict. (http://feeds.thisamericanlife.org/talpodcast) Unfilter: Jupiter Broadcasting's version of No Agenda. I used to listen to No Agenda but I find that it has become too long, and they tend to go off the deep end on some of their annalysis in my opinion. I find Unfilter to be a little more grounded, and it's an hour and a half once a week. I'll still listen to No agenda from time to time, but not regularly since I found this. (http://www.jupiterbroadcasting.com/feeds/unfilterogg.xml) Ham Radio Podcasts Linux in the Ham Shack: K5TUX and crew talk about the inersection of Ham and Linux. (http://lhspodcast.info/category/podcast-mp3/feed/) Resonant Frequency: another Ham radio podcast from an alum of Linux in the Ham Shack (http://rfpodcast.info/Podcast/feed/) Ham Nation: Twit's Ham radio podcast. Sometimes boring but I usually watch it anyways. (http://amateurlogic.tv/transmitter/feeds/ipod.xml) Amateurlogic: a great ham radio (and a little bit more) vieo podcast. A lot of making and hacking going on in this one. (http://amateurlogic.tv/transmitter/feeds/ipod.xml) Science Podcast Radiolab: NPR radio podcast. Good interesting science. (http://feeds.wnyc.org/radiolab) Star Talk: Neil DeGrasse Tyson's radio show. Brings on guests to discuss sciene in a general audience way. (http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:38128127/sounds.rss) This Week in Science: A good weekly roudtable science news podcast. Used to be a TWiT show but has branched out on it's own. (http://feeds.feedburner.com/twis/science/) Buddhism I listen to a lot of random budhism podcasts but this is the must listen to. Buddhist Geeks: Modern take on culture, science and society's impact on Budhism. Tends to be academic, but I enjoy it. (http://feeds.feedburner.com/BuddhistGeeksPodcast) Vedic Mythology and Mantras Podcast: While not Buddhist specifically I have always loved Vedic mythology and Indian music. In my mind the relationship between the Vedic traditions and Buddhist are similar to Judaism to Christianity. This podcast gies a short mythological story and a chant that goes along with it. It's no longer being produced but it has lots of episodes to listen to. (http://www.puja.net/wordpress/category/mythologypodcast/) TWiT Shows All About Android: (http://leo.am/podcasts/aaa.xml) This Week in Computer Hardware: (http://leo.am/podcasts/twich/) This Week in Google: (http://leo.am/podcasts/twig/) TWiT: (http://feeds.twit.tv/twit) Know How: (http://amateurlogic.tv/transmitter/feeds/ipod.xml)

Written by Thaj Sara

January 19th, 2015 at 6:00 pm

Posted in Linux

Monumental Android Failure | CR 137

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Well known developers have recently gone public with how much they make & where they make it from. Mike & Chris chew on the numbers & discuss the raw reality.

Plus great feedback on Chris’ first development language & more!

Written by Jupiter Broadcasting

January 19th, 2015 at 5:20 pm

Posted in Linux

Anonymous Mailings | FauxShow 205

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Angela and Chris read through the websites of popular anonymous mailings including the glitter and poop mailing services. This FauxShow contains explicit language.

Written by Jupiter Broadcasting

January 18th, 2015 at 9:09 pm

Posted in Linux

The Deepin Review | Linux Action Show 348

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Deepin Linux might just be one of the freshest takes on the desktop this year. We review this compelling Ubuntu based alternative.

Plus: The Steam bug that leaves you fresh and clean, some great new open source releases, goodbye Photoshop…

AND SO MUCH MORE!

All this week on, The Linux Action Show!

Written by chris@linuxactionshow.com

January 18th, 2015 at 6:09 pm

Posted in Linux

HPR1686: Interview with Joel Gibbard of OpenHand

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This show is an interview with Joel Gibbard founder of the OpenHand project. The interview was recorded on my phone which unfortunately created a few glitches. I've cleaned the audio up as best I can. Although frustrating, the occasional glitches have not caused anything to be missed that cannot be inferred from the context of the recording. After creating an artificial hand for his degree project Joel Gibbard wanted to continue the work on the hand with the goal of producing a workable prosthetic hand for $1000, so he launched the OpenHand project with a succesful IndieGoGo fundraiser. In this interview we learn more about the Dextrus hand, the project's progress to date, and hear of Joel's vision of affordable prosthetics for amputees worldwide. For a short 4 minute introduction to the project see Joel's video at http://tinyurl.com/ohvid (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dI-dNE2yQ0) The openhand designs and more information are available at http://www.openhandproject.org/ and http://www.openbionics.com/

Written by Steve Bickle

January 18th, 2015 at 6:00 pm

Posted in Linux